Two people have died after contracting a pigeon infection at a Glasgow hospital



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Two deaths in a hospital in Scotland are reported to have been linked to fungal diseases in the air that are commonly associated with pigeon feces.

According to the Guardian, the death occurred at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow where it was believed the patient had contracted Cryptococcus infection after bird droppings somehow entered a non-public space containing a machine.

Although officials refused to provide details about the deaths that cited secrecy, one case involving an elderly person might have been caused by other factors, and the other was being investigated, the BBC noted.

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GLASGOW, SCOTLAND – 21 JANUARY: Cars parked outside Queen Elizabeth University Hospital on January 21, 2019 in Glasgow, Scotland. Two patients died in Glasgow hospitals, after contracting a fungal infection associated with pigeon feces. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell / Getty Images)

FILE: An anesthetist monitors the patient's heart rate and other data displayed on electronic monitors during operations in the theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, England, on Monday, February 20, 2017 When the British government proposed spending 160 million pounds ($ 207 million) to support medical research and health care, we chose our best archive of health. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd / Bloomberg via Getty Images

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND – JANUARY 21: A wall displays Queen Elizabeth University Hospital outside the hospital on January 21, 2019 in Glasgow, Scotland. Two patients died in Glasgow hospitals, after contracting a fungal infection associated with pigeon feces. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell / Getty Images)

FILE: A medical staff member secures his face mask while working in an operating room at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, England, on Monday, February 20, 2017. The British government proposes spending 160 million pounds ($ 207 million) to support medical research and health care, we chose our best archive image about health. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd / Bloomberg via Getty Images

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND – 21 JANUARY: A man walks by Queen Elizabeth University Hospital on January 21, 2019 in Glasgow, Scotland. Two patients died in Glasgow hospitals, after contracting a fungal infection associated with pigeon feces. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell / Getty Images)

FILE: Medical staff work in the background when pressure infusion bags hang from medical units inside the operating room at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, England, on Monday, February 20, 2017. When the British government proposes spending 160 million pounds ($ 207 million) to support medical research and health care, we choose our best archive of health. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Scottish Finance Secretary Derek Mackay (second right) watched a teaching session on cardio-lung resuscitation (CPR) in the simulation room environment at the Center for Teaching and Learning, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow. (Photo by David Cheskin / Picture PA via Getty Images)




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A spokesman for NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde from the UK has tried to eliminate fears about fungi, saying: "This organism is not harmful to most people and rarely causes disease in humans."

After death, hospitals have cleaned potentially contaminated rooms, installed extra air filters in certain areas, and began providing preventive care for some vulnerable patients.

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