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The Best Travel Technology Prize to be given in 2019



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Not all of us often travel with camping / hiking backpacks like the travelers of these delightful photographs - fortunately, we have a number of recommendations about technologies that are adapted to life while traveling.
Enlarge / Not all of us often travel with camping / hiking backpacks like the travelers of these delightful photographs – fortunately, we have a number of recommendations about technologies that are adapted to life while traveling.

Hinterhaus Productions / Getty Images

Traveling can be a fun and enlightening experience, but packing for your trip is often stressful. Everything you choose for you to carry on your trip must have a destination, because unnecessary items are not included in anyone's narrow suitcase. Whether you are traveling for business or pleasure, it may be difficult to decide which technology is right for you and only for you think will be useful.

It's also hard to find a gadget that is suitable for traveling – a device that works more efficiently when you are not in a normal environment. To overcome this, Ars has chosen some of the best travel technology prizes that will be a strong addition to anyone's travel bag. All items below we have personally tested or reviewed, so we are confident in saying that none of these devices will die, be left behind, at the bottom of your suitcase.

Note: Ars Technica can get compensation for sales from the link on this post through the affiliate program.

Dell XPS 13

Dell XPS Laptop 13. "Src =" https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/xps132019_15-640x427.jpg "width =" 640 "height =" 427 "srcset =" https: //cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/xps132019_15-1280x853.jpg 2x
Enlarge / Dell XPS 13 Laptop.

Valentina Palladino

Dell has made and remade the XPS 13 to be one of the most travel-friendly laptops you can get. It weighs 2.7 pounds and is 11.6mm thick, very thin considering how much power has been built into the chassis. The 2019 model with an Intel 9-gen processor is our current favorite Windows ultrabook, and Dell has recently updated the machine to include an Intel 10-gen processor. Regardless of the model you get, you get a Windows laptop that doesn't interfere with performance while it's sleek and attractive.

That said, the latest XPS 13 does offer many improvements compared to last year's model. First and foremost, the webcam has been moved to the top of the screen rather than sitting on the bottom like for years. This makes the webcam much more functional, and Dell doesn't sacrifice screen space to make it happen. You can get a display in the 1080p panel, but there are 4K panel options now too. In terms of ports, you get three USB-C ports (two of which are Thunderbolt 3) in addition to the headphone jack, microSD card slot, and key slot.

Although we hope the XPS 13 has an IR camera for face recognition, it has a fingerprint reader embedded in the power button, so you will get a quick biometric login from it. We also appreciate that the 4K model can last 13 hours on a single charge (according to our tests), and you can configure the XPS 13 to get up to 21 hours of battery life.

Dell gives you many configuration options on the XPS 13, making it a good choice for anyone who wants to truly customize their laptop. The only bad part is that the base model starts with 4GB RAM (the next step is 8GB RAM, and we would recommend most people have the amount of memory in their main machine). Regardless of how you configure it, XPS 13 is a solid laptop that will be a hard worker wherever you feel working.

For those who want a machine that is a bit more flexible (plus a little thinner and lighter), consider Microsoft Surface Pro. Surface Pro 6 years ago is our favorite Windows that can now be removed and you can still find a powerful configuration of this device at a good price. Those who want the latest and greatest (plus the newly added USB-C port) should consider Surface Pro 7.

Dell XPS 13 product images "class =" ars-circle-image-img ars-buy-box-image

Dell XPS 13

(Ars Technica can get compensation for sales from the link on this post through the affiliate program.)

Logitech MX Master Anywhere 2s

Logitech's MX Master Anywhere 2s mouse. "Src =" https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/logimxmasteranywhere2s-640x427.jpg "width =" 640 "height =" 427 "srcset =" https: //cdn.arstechnica .net / wp-content / uploads / 2019/11 / logimxmasteranywhere2s-1280x854.jpg 2x
Enlarge / Logitech's MX Master Anywhere 2s mouse.

Valentina Palladino

The travel-friendly mouse is a dime a dozen, but the MX Master Anywhere 2s from Logitech puts some of the best features found on a stationary mouse into a travel-sized device. This mouse feels smaller than other Logitech mice, and although it might take some time to get used to, this is the perfect sized mouse to live in your backpack, office, or travel bag.

The Darkfield 4000 dpi sensor helps track almost any surface, even glass, so you can use it wherever you feel it works. It has a rechargeable battery that can last up to 70 days on a single charge, and recharge using a microUSB port. This works with macOS and Windows devices, as well as iPadOS and Linux, and you can pair this mouse with up to three devices at once and switch between them with just the push of a button. Like most Logitech accessories, the MX Master Anywhere 2s is connected to the PC via Bluetooth or a USB receiver.

In addition to adjustable pointer and scroll speeds, you can also adjust the five buttons on the MX Master Anywhere 2s. This is one of the features that I like about Logitech's main mouse, and I'm glad the company makes a travel mouse that works almost exactly like you can use every day at your main desk. MX Master Anywhere 2s can be your main mouse if you prefer smaller mice, but it's very hard to beat as a travel mouse – especially at a price of $ 54.99.

Logitech MX Master Anywhere 2s product image "class =" ars-circle-image-img ars-buy-box-image

Logitech MX Master Anywhere 2s

(Ars Technica can get compensation for sales from the link on this post through the affiliate program.)

Anker PowerCore 10000 PD Redux

RedC PowerCore 10000 PD Redux portable battery next to Google Pixel 3a. "Src =" https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/anker-powercore-10000-pd-redux-640x398. jpg "width =" 640 "height =" 398 "srcset =" https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/anker-powercore-10000-pd-redux-1280x796.jpg 2x
Enlarge / Portable PowerCore 10000 PD Redux Anker battery next to Google Pixel 3a.

Jeff Dunn

There are countless power banks that can effectively keep devices charged while traveling, but for explicit portable options, we like Anker's PowerCore 10000 PD Redux. The main reason for that is size: at seven ounces and 106 × 52.3 × 25.5mm, the PowerCore is very small and light enough to fit into many trouser pockets, let alone handbags or luggage, without being too conspicuous. All of them are held together firmly, with rounded edges that subtly make the battery more comfortable to hold and store in your people.

In addition, it includes a USB-C Power Delivery (PD) port that charges 18W, which is strong enough to recharge most new smartphones with maximum speed. (It's not fast enough to recharge high-end tablets like the iPad Pro at maximum speed, but it will still speed up the process to some extent.) There is a 12W USB-A port too, which is useful if you have multiple low-power devices. Because the battery is maximal at 18W output, even though it's most suitable for smartphone charging above all else.

The PowerCore has a capacity of 10,000 mAh (36Wh), which is enough to get about two full charges from the iPhone 11. The LED light quartet tells you how much capacity is left at any given time, and the battery itself can be recharged at 18W with a charger USB-C PD wall, so it doesn't take long to fully recover. We don't have a clue about reliability issues after months of use, and Anker generally has a strong reputation in this market, but this device is protected by an 18-month warranty if something goes wrong. With a price of $ 46, this is not the cheapest power bank in its class, but it comes with a USB-C to USB-C cable in the box, and we think the combination of good power and genuine portability is worth it.

Anker PowerCore 10000 PD Redux product image "class =" ars-circle-image-img ars-buy-box-image

Anker PowerCore 10000 PD Redux

(Ars Technica can get compensation for sales from the link on this post through the affiliate program.)

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