Beware, this is the only place that will destroy your diet



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Pizza ordered for functioning lunch. Cake to celebrate a colleague's birthday. Potato chips in a vending machine.

Food like this is too prevalent at work, according to a study released Tuesday. And for America to overcome its obesity epidemic, the food provided or purchased in the workplace needs to be improved so that it is more in line with dietary guidelines, the researchers urged.

More than 23% of workers surveyed buy or have free food at work, and usually score high on empty calories, sodium and processed grains.

More than 23% of workers surveyed either buy or have free food at work, and usually high-score empty calories, sodium and processed grains, research is determined.

"The main types of food obtained include foods that are usually high in solid fat, added sugar, or sodium, such as pizza, ordinary soft drinks, cakes or brownies, cakes and pies, and sweets," according to the paper that appeared in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Diet.

Americans hoard the weight. Federal government data shows that nearly 40% of adults are obese in 2015-2016, compared to 30.5% in 1999-2000. Annual medical costs for obesity – which means a person's body mass index exceeds a certain point – have reached around $ 149 billion.

The new study is a different view on severe problems, recognizing "little is known about the behavior of food in the workplace." About 150 million Americans spend most of their time at work – and may be stressed eating.

Of course, changing the menu at work alone will not improve the nation's obesity epidemic. This is a complex public health problem that is not only about calorie counting, but also about accessibility to healthy food.

For example, a recent study concluded that the number of food advertisements targeting a large number of African-American and Hispanic youth is related to junk food. Obesity rates for children also increased, namely 18.5% in 2015-2016, compared to 13.9% in 1999-2000.

About 150 million Americans spend most of their time waking up at work – and may be stressed eating.

However, health programs in the workplace – which, in other contexts, can help smoking employees break habits or encourage physical activity – are very suitable for influencing better food choices in the workplace, the researchers said.

"Incorporating food service guidelines into health programs can help employers offer attractive and healthy options that give employees choice," said Stephen Onufrak, principal researcher, who is a researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Nutrition Division, Physical Activity Prevention, Physical Activity and Obesity .

Some people question how effective the health program is. A separate study does not show much difference in absenteeism, productivity and general health between workers who enroll in health programs at work and those who do not.

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Research on food at work began with more than 5,000 working adults recording all the food they consumed over a seven-day period. Data was collected between April 2012 and January 2013.

Research on food at work began with more than 5,000 working adults recording all the food they consumed over a seven-day period.

The study also ranks the most commonly obtained foods and beverages at work, whether workers pay them no.

Coffee was the first and most distant, consumed in 849 times during the trial period.

Regular soft drinks are in second place, quaffed 511 times and the most consumed sandwiches are third, knitted 317 times.

Overall, study participants ate or drank nearly 6,850 items – more than 70% of food and drinks at work for free.

A person's educational background is the strongest predictor of whether they have food at work. College graduates are twice as likely to have food on the spot, compared to secondary school graduates.

The researchers point to previous studies that say adults with a bachelor's degree are more likely to work for large employers, who, in turn, are more likely to have vending machines and cafeterias in their place.

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