NASA confirmed the mysterious blue light seen in InSight photos by actor William Shatner was a lens flare



[ad_1]

It may take a while before NASA's landing InSight begins to rummage through the data, but new Mars explorers continue to transport in preparation.

A new animation shared by the space agency shows InSight getting a grapple instrument in its place, in a process that is very similar to ancient cup-and-ball games.

InSight has spent the last two months slowly preparing its instruments and conducting a health assessment of equipment before its mission to listen to underground marsquake.

Meanwhile, landed social media accounts have attracted the attention of many space enthusiasts – including Star Trek actor William Shatner, who questioned the source of the strange blue light that appeared in several photos.

Scroll down for videos

A new animation shared by the space agency shows InSight getting a grapple instrument in its place, in a process that is very similar to ancient cup-and-ball games. The grapple is one of many instruments that will help InSight collect unprecedented data about the red planet

‘After several attempts, I was successfully crushed by a grapple, reaching for a small restraint mounted on my arm," the InSight Twitter account was shared this weekend.

‘A kind of Mars touch on a trophy and classic ball game. '

The animation posted next to the update shows the claw-like gripper chasing a small ball before finally catching it.

The grapple is one of many instruments that will help InSight collect unprecedented data about the red planet.

InSight's Twitter update sparked curiosity on social media last week when actor William Shatner noticed a blue light in one of his animations.

Lander social media accounts have attracted the attention of many space enthusiasts ¿including Star Trek actor William Shatner, who questioned the source of strange blue light that has appeared in several photos

Lander social media accounts have attracted the attention of many space enthusiasts ¿including Star Trek actor William Shatner, who questioned the source of strange blue light that has appeared in several photos

Lander social media accounts have attracted the attention of many space enthusiasts – including Star Trek actor William Shatner, who questioned the source of strange blue light that has appeared in several photos

But, NASA said there was nothing unusual (or related to aliens) about dancing light.

"Only a few lenses light up when the sun sets low on the horizon," NASA explained on Twitter. "(Both photos were taken just before sunset.) There is no reason to worry, Captain!"

Earlier this month, the InSight lander leaned in to listen to better the underground vibrations of Mars. Robot explorers put a seismometer on the surface at the end of last month, and are now getting closer "to better connections with Mars."

This will help the instrument pick up a dimmer signal that might be missed.

A few days earlier, the InSight raised the seismometer and adjusted the internal sensor before lowering everything to the ground.

Images before and after showing the InSight instrument at the lowest position

Images before and after showing the InSight instrument at the lowest position

NASA's InSight lander is leaning in to hear better the underground vibrations of Mars. Robot explorers put a seismometer on the surface at the end of last month, and are now getting closer "to better connections with Mars." Before and after the picture shows the instrument at the lowest position yet

INSIGHTS OF THREE KEY INSTRUMENTS

Lander who can reveal how the Earth was formed: InSight landers will land on Mars on November 26

Lander who can reveal how the Earth was formed: InSight landers will land on Mars on November 26

Lander who can reveal how the Earth was formed: InSight landers will land on Mars on November 26

Three key instruments will allow landers of InSight to take the pulse & # 39; from the red planet:

Seismometer: InSight lander brings a seismometer, SEIS, who listens to the pulse of Mars.

Seismometers record waves that move through the interior structure of a planet.

Studying seismic waves tells us what might create waves.

On Mars, scientists suspect that the cause might be marsquake, or a meteorite that attacks the surface.

Hot probe: Heat flow investigations InSight, HP3, dig deeper than a spoon, drill or other probe on Mars before.

This will investigate how much heat is still flowing from Mars.

Radio antenna: Like the Earth, Mars vibrates a little when it rotates around its axis.

To study this, two radio antennas, part of the RISE instrument, track the landing location very precisely.

This helps scientists test planetary reflexes and tells them how interior structures affect the motion of planets around the Sun.

"It's always good to be centered and balanced," said InSight Twitter account shared.

The lander also releases slack in the cable so it doesn't fly around the wind.

Now, NASA says the instrument has been positioned to its lowest point but for the opportunity to listen as well as possible.

"My seismometer has now squatted to the lowest level, for better connections with Mars," the InSight Twitter account was posted this week. & # 39; Fainting signals are easier to hear if you bring your ear closer to the ground. & # 39;

InSight landers deployed their first instruments to the surface of Mars around the end of December.

The image of the lander shows a seismometer on the ground, after which it is lifted to the surface by a landing robot arm.

This will record waves that move through the planet's interior structure, and can help explain mysterious scientists & # 39; marsquake & # 39; that happens regularly.

At that time, NASA said the landing war was running perfectly, and ahead of schedule.

A new image from the lander shows a seismometer on the ground, after which it is lifted to the surface by a landing robot arm. This will record waves that move through the planet's interior structure, and can help explain mysterious scientists & # 39; marsquake & # 39; that happens regularly. This is the first time a science instrument has been placed on the surface of another planet.

A new image from the lander shows a seismometer on the ground, after which it is lifted to the surface by a landing robot arm. This will record waves that move through the planet's interior structure, and can help explain mysterious scientists & # 39; marsquake & # 39; that happens regularly. This is the first time a science instrument has been placed on the surface of another planet.

A new image from the lander shows a seismometer on the ground, after which it is lifted to the surface by a landing robot arm. This will record waves that move through the planet's interior structure, and can help explain mysterious scientists & # 39; marsquake & # 39; that happens regularly. This is the first time a science instrument has been placed on the surface of another planet.

WHAT WILL THE SEISMOMETER DO?

The seismometer allows scientists to peek into the Martian interior by studying ground movements – also known as marsquakes.

Each marsquake acts as a kind of light bulb that illuminates the structure of the planet's interior.

By analyzing how seismic waves pass through the planetary layer, scientists can deduce the depth and composition of this layer.

"The schedule of InSight activities on Mars has been better than we expected," said InSight Project Manager Tom Hoffman, based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

"Getting a seismometer safely on the ground is an amazing Christmas present."

The InSight team has been trying to deploy two special science instruments to Mars since landing on Mars on November 26.

The engineer tested the order for landers, making sure the model tested at the JPL used the right instrument as intended.

Scientists also have to analyze Mars field images around landers to find out the best place to spread the instrument.

On Tuesday, December 18, InSight engineers sent orders to the spacecraft.

On Wednesday, December 19, the seismometer is placed gently onto the ground right in front of the lander, about as far as the arm can reach – 5,367 feet, or 1,636 meters, away).

"The placement of a seismometer is as important as landing InSight on Mars," said InSight Main Investigator, Bruce Banerdt, based at JPL.

& # 39; Seismometer is the highest priority instrument in InSight: We need it to complete about three-quarters of our science goals. & # 39;

& # 39; Mars rock park & ​​# 39; which he built in the Pasadena warehouse to test the practice of his InSight explorer Engineers using the InSight instrument in a laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Some of them wear sunglasses to block bright yellow light in the test room, which mimics sunlight as seen on Mars.

& # 39; Mars rock park & ​​# 39; which he built in the Pasadena warehouse to test the practice of his InSight explorer Engineers using the InSight instrument in a laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Some of them wear sunglasses to block bright yellow light in the test room, which mimics sunlight as seen on Mars.

& # 39; Mars rock park & ​​# 39; which he built in the Pasadena warehouse to test the practice of his InSight explorer Engineers using the InSight instrument in a laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Some of them wear sunglasses to block bright yellow light in the test room, which mimics sunlight as seen on Mars.

The seismometer allows scientists to peek into the Martian interior by studying ground movements – also known as marsquakes.

"It has a seismometer on the ground like holding a telephone near your ear," said Philippe Lognonné, principal SEIS researcher from the Institute de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) and the University of Paris Diderot.

"We are pleased that we are now in the best position to listen to all the seismic waves from the surface of Mars and from the deep inside."

In the next few days, the InSight team will try to raise the level of the seismometer, which is on the ground tilted 2 to 3 degrees.

The first science seismometer data must start flowing back to Earth after the seismometer is in the right position.

"We look forward to releasing some Champagne when we start getting data from InSight seismometers on the ground," Banerdt added.

"I have a bottle ready for this event."

Meanwhile, Interior Structure Rotation and Experiments (RISE), which do not have separate instruments, have begun using InSight radio connections with Earth to collect preliminary data on the planet's core.

Not enough time has passed for scientists to deduce what they want to know – scientists estimate they might have some results starting in about a year.

This picture shows some instruments seen in a selfie picture sent back to Earth by the InSight early Tuesday morning

This picture shows some instruments seen in a selfie picture sent back to Earth by the InSight early Tuesday morning

This picture shows some instruments seen in a selfie picture sent back to Earth by the InSight early Tuesday morning

NASA also recently finally pointed to the exact landing location of its new Mars explorer, thanks to a powerful camera on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

While the space agency knows that InSight has landed in a 130-kilometer ellipse on the red planet, there is no way to determine exactly where it landed in this region.

Now, a series of images taken this week by HiRISE cameras from MRO have confirmed that landers, heat shields and parachutes are all within 1,000 feet of the lava plain called Elysium Planitia.

NASA finally pointed to the exact landing location of the new Mars explorer, thanks to a powerful camera on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

NASA finally pointed to the exact landing location of the new Mars explorer, thanks to a powerful camera on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

While the space agency knows that InSight has landed in a 130-kilometer ellipse on the red planet, there is no way to determine exactly where it landed in this region.

While the space agency knows that InSight has landed in a 130-kilometer ellipse on the red planet, there is no way to determine exactly where it landed in this region.

NASA finally pointed to the exact landing location of the new Mars explorer, thanks to a powerful camera on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. While the space agency knew that InSight had landed in a 130-kilometer ellipse on the red planet, there was no way to determine exactly where InSight landed in this region.

In the images released today by NASA, InSight and its parts appear as bright spots on a rustic landscape.

But in reality, this is only a trick of light.

"Light bounces off its surface causing color to become saturated," explained NASA.

& # 39; The land around the landing area is dark, retrorockets have been destroyed when it came down. Look carefully at the butterfly shape, and you can see the lander solar panels on both sides. & # 39;

A few days ago, NASA's InSight lander who just took his first selfie from the red planet, made the mission team (and the rest of the world) look at the solar panels and deck well now after they were finished.

InSight also sends back the first complete display of a 14-by-7-foot plot of land that will immediately function as & # 39; workspace & # 39 ;.

In the images released today by NASA, InSight and its parts appear as bright spots on a rustic landscape. But in reality, this is only a trick of light

In the images released today by NASA, InSight and its parts appear as bright spots on a rustic landscape. But in reality, this is only a trick of light

In the images released today by NASA, InSight and its parts appear as bright spots on a rustic landscape. But in reality, this is only a trick of light

A series of images taken this week by HiRISE cameras from MRO have confirmed that landers (red dots), heat shields and parachutes all sit within 1,000 feet of the lava plain called Elysium Planitia. Previously, space agencies only knew that they had landed in an 81-mile ellipse (blue)

A series of images taken this week by HiRISE cameras from MRO have confirmed that landers (red dots), heat shields and parachutes all sit within 1,000 feet of the lava plain called Elysium Planitia. Previously, space agencies only knew that they had landed in an 81-mile ellipse (blue)

A series of images taken this week by HiRISE cameras from MRO have confirmed that landers (red dots), heat shields and parachutes all sit within 1,000 feet of the lava plain called Elysium Planitia. Previously, space agencies only knew that they had landed in an 81-mile ellipse (blue)

Every new picture is a mosaic of several catches that are put together.

While the selfie, which is captured by a robotic arm, is a combination of 11 images, the workspace display includes 52 individual photos.

This allows scientists to see the area well before the InSight begins to lay its instruments and dig into the ground.

"There are almost no rocks, hills, and holes which means it will be very safe for our instruments," said Chief Investigator InSight Bruce Banerdt of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

"This might seem like simple land if it wasn't on Mars, but we were happy to see it."

NASA has confirmed the landing site for the InSight, its parachute and other components thanks to a new image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

NASA has confirmed the landing site for the InSight, its parachute and other components thanks to a new image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

NASA has confirmed the landing site for the InSight, its parachute and other components thanks to a new image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

InSight also sends back the first complete display of a 14-by-7-foot plot that will immediately function as & # 39; workspace, & # 39; shown in the blue crescent. The team said it looked very safe & # 39;

InSight also sends back the first complete display of a 14-by-7-foot plot that will immediately function as & # 39; workspace, & # 39; shown in the blue crescent. The team said it looked very safe & # 39;

InSight's parachute, heat shield, and back skin all landed around 1,000 feet from it

InSight's parachute, heat shield, and back skin all landed around 1,000 feet from it

Previous InSight sent back the first complete display of a 14-by-7-foot plot that will immediately function as & # 39; workspace, & # 39; shown in the blue crescent. The team said it looked very safe & # 39; The parachute, rear skin, and heat shield all landed around 1,000 feet away

Even Mars robots act like tourists occasionally. NASA's new InSight lander has taken his first selfie from the red planet, giving the mission team (and around the world) a good view of solar panels and decks now after settling in

Even Mars robots act like tourists occasionally. NASA's new InSight lander has taken his first selfie from the red planet, giving the mission team (and around the world) a good view of solar panels and decks now after settling in

Even Mars robots act like tourists occasionally. NASA's new InSight lander has taken his first selfie from the red planet, giving the mission team (and the rest of the world) a good look at the solar panels and deck now after finishing.

For about the past week, InSight has sent back the first of its observations – including clips of light passing through the surface, and Mars wind recordings.

All this happens when the lander and the team behind the operation are preparing to start working in the next few months.

For now, however, InSight takes a small step.

The lander flexed his 6 foot long arm this week, taking a picture of the terrain directly in front of him.

& # 39; Carefully swinging my hand in front of me, I began to see the ground in front of me, where I would do my work & # 39; Nasa InSight account tweeted.

& # 39; Meanwhile, it was somewhat hypnotized by the game of light and shadow in my arm & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Carefully swinging my hand in front of me, I began to see the ground in front of me where I would do my work & # 39; s Nasa InSight account tweeted this week. & # 39; Meanwhile, it was somewhat hypnotized by the game of light and shadow in my arm & # 39 ;. This effect can be seen in the clip above

Data collected by InSight Seismic Experiments for Interior Structure (SEIS) in the months before being transferred to the ground will eventually be used to cancel background noise because it serves to detect swamps.

Data collected by InSight Seismic Experiments for Interior Structure (SEIS) in the months before being transferred to the ground will eventually be used to cancel background noise because it serves to detect swamps.

Data collected by InSight Seismic Experiments for Interior Structure (SEIS) in the months before being transferred to the ground will eventually be used to cancel background noise because it serves to detect marsquake

Just a few days earlier, NASA revealed the InSight lander caught the voice of the 'dust demon' & # 39; Mars during its first days on the red planet.

According to the space agency, this is the first time we have heard of Mars winds.

The low roar detected by the InSight sensor is estimated to blow between 10 to 15 mph (5 to 7 meters per second) from northwest to southeast – and, recordings are within reach of human hearing.

NASA said the sounds recorded on December 1 were parallel to the trail of dust devils observed in the landing area.

Vibrations are recorded in very low tones, although those with sharp ears will be able to hear them as they are, using headphones or a subwoofer.

To make it clearer, NASA increased its pitch by two octaves, making it heard on laptops and mobile devices.

The space agency shares a series of high-resolution photos taken this week. InSight will immediately begin shooting terrain images directly in front of it, so the team can choose the best location to search. Solar panels that will help power the engine are described

The space agency shares a series of high-resolution photos taken this week. InSight will immediately begin shooting terrain images directly in front of it, so the team can choose the best location to search. Solar panels that will help power the engine are described

The space agency shares a series of high-resolution photos taken this week. InSight will immediately begin shooting terrain images directly in front of it, so the team can choose the best location to search. Solar panels that will help power the engine are described

While InSight did not set out to record Mars winds, in particular, the team said this type of data collection came with the region.

The lander detects wind vibrations with two sensors: one designed to measure air pressure, and with a seismometer on the deck.

& # 39; Capturing this audio are unplanned treats, & # 39; said Bruce Banerdt, InSight principal researcher at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab.

"But one of the things that is the task of our mission is to measure movement on Mars, and of course it includes movements caused by sound waves."

According to the InSight team, two different instruments record sound in different ways.

While the air pressure sensor Auxiliary Payload Sensor Subsystem records vibrations directly, the seismometer captures vibrations caused by wind passing through the landing solar panel.

Data collected by InSight Seismic Experiments for Interior Structure (SEIS) in the months before being transferred to the ground will eventually be used to cancel background noise because it serves to detect marsquake.

The short-period silicon sensor (SP) can detect vibrations with frequencies of up to 50 hertz, which are in the lower range of human hearing, NASA said.

& # 39; InSight landers act like giant ears, & # 39; said Tom Pike, a member of the InSight science and sensor team designed at Imperial College London.

Surya The solar panel on the landing side responds to fluctuations in wind pressure.

& # 39; This is like the InSight that cupped his ears and heard the Mars wind hit him. When we look at the direction of the landing vibration coming from the solar panel, it matches the wind direction expected at our landing site. & # 39;

InSight landed in the area known as Elysium Planitia. The location can be seen on the map above, not far from the location of the Curiosity 2012 mission landing, the last NASA vehicle to land on Mars

InSight landed in the area known as Elysium Planitia. The location can be seen on the map above, not far from the location of the Curiosity 2012 mission landing, the last NASA vehicle to land on Mars

InSight landed in the area known as Elysium Planitia. The location can be seen on the map above, not far from the location of the Curiosity 2012 mission landing, the last NASA vehicle to land on Mars

NASA's InSight lander finally removed the lens cover from the camera, allowing the robot explorer to take the clearest picture of his new home.

NASA's InSight lander finally removed the lens cover from the camera, allowing the robot explorer to take the clearest picture of his new home.

NASA's InSight lander finally removed the lens cover from the camera, allowing the robot explorer to take the clearest picture of his new home.

The team has released raw and unchanged audio samples from the seismometer record and the second version has been raised by two octaves to make it easier to hear.

For the latter, the APSS sample is accelerated by a factor of 100.

According to experts, sound sources are quite easy; the vibration detected by an instrument is very similar to the change in air pressure that you hear when a flag whips up the wind.

"That really sounds – a change in air pressure," said science leader Don Banfield InSight for APSS from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

"You hear that every time you talk to someone across the room."

[ad_2]

Source link