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Huawei denies making mistakes, seeking urgent meetings with ministers



Huawei New Zealand has denied making a mistake and said it had no contact with the government since yesterday's announcement that it had been blocked from participating in making 5G Spark.

He sought "an urgent meeting with Ministers and relevant officials to understand the Government's position and obtain clarification of the process from here," Huawei New Zealand deputy managing director Andrew Bowater said in a statement.

He also denied that there was evidence of mistakes made by Huawei.

"Huawei will welcome the opportunity to actively overcome the problem and work together to find a way forward," he said.

Yesterday afternoon, Spark overtook the government and GCSB by announcing the findings of the security agency, and said that now it cannot use Huawei's device to increase the 5G delay to its cellular network.

"The Director General has informed Spark today that he considers Spark's proposal to use Huawei 5G equipment in Spark's 5G RAN plan, if implemented, increasing national security risks significantly," Spark said.

"Under TICSA [The Telecommunications Interception Capability & Security Act], this means that Spark cannot apply or effect the proposal to use the Huawei RAN equipment in the planned 5G network. "

But GCSB's assessment that Huawei's 5G technology raises a "significant national security risk" is "not a ban," Andrew Little told the Herald this morning.

Slightly stressed that the relevant security law is "project based. We will never ban certain companies or certain countries. That is not how it works."

The decision was specifically for Spark's proposal to use Huawei's device to increase the 5G delay to its cellular network.

He has no problems with Huawei devices that already exist in Spark and other telecommunications networks or, potentially, different Huawei technologies used in future improvements; Spark can still work with Huawei to address security risks with 5G, said the GCSB Minister.

Huawei's Bowater said he denied there was evidence of an error by Huawei.

"We strongly reject the notion that our business threatens New Zealand in any way. We have the right to get the opportunity to hear our voices and to address concerns in good faith," he said.

"Since Huawei was founded in New Zealand in 2005 it has always worked in good faith
with the Government and other industry players. We believe that our involvement is in
the telecommunications sector has benefited New Zealand's economy, business and business
consumer. "


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