Monday , June 21 2021

Surreal-colored photos of the First World War & # 39; tell old stories in new ways & # 39;



A soldier said goodbye to his family. A politician reviews the troops. A baseball game provides a distraction from the rigors of war. Here are some pictures at the Vimy Foundation They Fight in Color, a new book that collects 260 colorized digital photos that showcase Canada's contribution to the First World War.

Jeremy Diamond, executive director of the foundation, called it "a way for us to tell old stories in new ways."

RELATED: Margaret Atwood's writing about & # 39; two worlds & # 39; before and after the Great War

"The faces of people in many cases look like the people we know today," Diamond said. "It makes it easier for people to connect, which I think is very important when you talk about stories from the past."

The color was added by Mark Truelove, a high school-based artist who studied the process by working on photos of his own family. Truelove does extensive research to get the colors as accurately as possible, from patch colors to uniforms to weather on the day of taking photos.

Bill Nix returned from war. (Fonds 1244, Item 904A / City of Toronto Archives / Vimy Foundation)

This photo is from the Canadian Float Loan Victory Loan c. 1917 is one of the images in the Vimy Foundation "They Fought in Color," a new book that collects 260 digital color photos that showcase Canada's contribution to the First World War. (John Boyd, PA-025181 / Canadian Library and Archives / Vimy Foundation)

A new book by the Vimy Foundation, "They Fought in Color," collects 260 color digitizing photos that showcase Canada's contribution to war. In this picture, a baseball game at Camp Smiths Lawn, 1 September 1917. (Box 3849, Access 177-288 photo album 2 / PA-118481 / Canadian Library and Archives / Vimy Foundation).

A Canadian soldier in the Meet Sports Division does not balance fete. June 1918. (PA- 002765 / Canadian Library and Archives / Vimy Foundation)

Star athlete Cogwagee, or Tom Longboat (right), is a messenger in the army, where long distance running skills serve him well. June 1917. (PA-001479 / Canadian Library and Archives / Vimy Foundation).


Source link