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How Alberta pays Quebec bills: Four graphs showing Alberta taking tabs



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In just 11 years, Albertans has paid nearly $ 240 billion throughout Canada.

That number is more than one and a half times more than B.C. and Ontario combined, with taxpayers contributing $ 54.6 billion and $ 97.9 billion respectively, the two largest net contributors to the federal balance sheet.

The money was sent to Ottawa as part of net federal fiscal transfers – basically residents of Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario pay more in federal taxes than they get back in federal programs and transfers – they are a positive net contributor to federal finance. And in the case of Alberta, it has been doing it for years.

Other provinces are net negative contributors – they get more in federal programs and transfers than they give in taxes. In the Quebec case, the net negative contributor was minus $ 171.3 billion from 2007-2018.

Figures from Statistics Canada show that $ 240 billion in Alberta reaches around $ 5,000 per year – for 11 years – for Alberta taxpayers.

Ben Eisen, a senior colleague from the Fraser Institute Provincial Prosperity Initiative, said the results, per capita, are difficult to ignore.

"Although there are economic challenges that can reduce net contributions to federal finance, it remains true that Alberta is a major contributor to public finance," he said in a telephone interview.

"Much more tax revenue comes to Ottawa from Albertans than what returns to Alberta in terms of services and federal transfers."

Trevor Tombe, an associate professor from the department of economics at the University of Calgary, said the results were not surprising.

"The high amount of income collected per person is due to the high level of income that exists in Alberta," he said in a telephone interview and pointed to the province "above the level of average economic strength."

"If you ask people‘ Should taxes depend on their income, 'most people will say yes. "

Tombe added that Alberta has the youngest population in Canada, which means it receives less income from federal benefits such as the Old Age Insurance program and the Canadian Pension Plan.

Statistics Canada also shows that Quebec benefited the most from the equalization program, generating $ 107.5 billion. The program moves federal tax dollars to the provinces with less money so that all Canadians have comparable public services at comparable tax rates.

How the statistics collected changed 11 years ago so Statistics Canada did not have comparable figures before that. However, a study by the University of Calgary's School of Public Policy shows that from 1961 to 2017, Alberta's federal net fiscal transfers amounted to more than $ 600 billion.

How much money Alberta is contributing to throughout Canada is one of the things that will be examined by a panel formed by Prime Minister Jason Kenney when he seeks a "fair agreement" from Ottawa.

"Albertans has been working for Ottawa for too long, it's time for Ottawa to start working for us," Kenney said in a speech at the Alberta Manning Networking Conference. "We Albert people will not lose their minds, we are practical people, we are not unreasonable people. Nothing we ask makes no sense. "

The feeling of alienation in the west was highlighted by Liberals who were ostracized from Alberta and Saskatchewan in federal elections.

Eisen said he hoped the data would "promote a sense of cooperation and help Canadians from coast to coast understand how much Alberta is contributing to everyone's welfare."

"Strong Alberta benefits the whole country, when there is an economically strong Alberta, it spreads throughout the country," he said.

"Ottawa would be far worse without Alberta's contribution. This will endanger taxpayers in all provinces because of debt service payments. Canada cannot achieve its full economic potential if Alberta does not reach its full economic potential. "

Below is a complete set of Canadian Statistics data.

POSITIVE CONTRIBUTORS

Alberta

Clean federal fiscal transfers

$ 22.2 billion – 2007
$ 22.5 billion – 2008
$ 17.7 billion – 2009
$ 16.6 billion – 2010
$ 17.9 billion – 2011
$ 19.2 billion – 2012
$ 23.5 billion – 2013
$ 27.1 billion – 2014
$ 24.8 billion – 2015
$ 16.0 billion – 2016
$ 15.3 billion – 2017
$ 17.2 billion – 2018

Total: $ 239,847 billion

Equation accepted

There is no

British Columbia

Clean federal fiscal transfers

$ 6.6 billion – 2007
$ 4.4 billion – 2008
$ 935 million – 2009
– $ 1.8 billion – 2010
$ 1.4 billion – 2011
$ 3.2 billion – 2012
$ 3.2 billion – 2013
$ 4.7 billion – 2014
$ 6.1 billion – 2015
$ 7.2 billion – 2016
$ 8.5 billion – 2017
$ 10.2 billion – 2018

Total: $ 54.7 billion

Equation accepted

$ 116 million – 2007
$ 187 million – 2009
$ 62 million – 2010

Total: $ 365 million

Ontario

Clean federal fiscal transfers

$ 18.2 billion – 2007
$ 9.1 billion – 2008
– $ 2.5 billion – 2009
– $ 10.8 billion – 2010
– $ 991 million – 2011
$ 1.3 billion – 2012
$ 2.5 billion – 2013
$ 8.9 billion – 2014
$ 13.5 billion – 2015
$ 16.3 billion – 2016
$ 20.7 billion – 2017
$ 21.7 billion – 2018

Total: $ 97,914 billion

Equation accepted

There were none in 2007 and 2008
$ 285 million – 2009
$ 851 million – 2010
$ 2.0 billion – 2011
$ 3.0 billion – 201
$ 3.2 billion – 2013
$ 2.3 billion – 2014
$ 2.3 billion – 2015
$ 2.3 billion – 2016
$ 1.4 billion – 2017
$ 968 million – 2018

Total: $ 18,527 billion

NEGATIVE CONTRIBUTORS

Quebec

Clean federal fiscal transfers

– $ 7.0 billion – 2007
– $ 13.0 billion – 2008
– $ 16.3 billion – 2009
– $ 18.5 billion – 2010
– $ 15.8 billion – 2011
– $ 14.8 billion – 2012
– $ 14.7 billion – 2013
– $ 15.0 billion – 2014
– $ 14.0 billion – 2015
– $ 14.3 billion – 2016
– $ 15.1 billion – 2017
– $ 12.9 billion – 2018

Total: – $ 171.3 billion

Equation accepted

$ 6.8 billion – 2007
$ 8.1 billion – 2008
$ 8.4 billion – 2009
$ 8.8 billion – 2010
$ 8.7 billion – 2011
$ 7.8 billion – 2012
$ 7.8 billion – 2013
$ 9.0 billion – 2014
$ 9.6 billion – 2015
$ 9.8 billion – 2016
$ 11.0 billion – 2017
$ 11.8 billion – 2018

Total: $ 107.6 billion

Nova Scotia

Clean federal fiscal transfers

– $ 5.1 billion – 2007
– $ 6.0 billion – 2008
– $ 6.2 billion – 2009
– $ 6.5 billion – 2010
– $ 6.5 billion – 2011
– $ 6.8 billion – 2012
– $ 6.6 billion – 2013
– $ 6.3 billion – 2014
– $ 6.5 billion – 2015
– $ 6.4 billion – 2016
– $ 6.7 billion – 2017
– $ 7.1 billion – 2018

Total: – $ 76.7 billion

Equation accepted

$ 1.4 billion – 2007
$ 1.5 billion – 2008
$ 1.5 billion – 2009
$ 1.4 billion – 2010
$ 1.5 billion – 2011
$ 1.6 billion – 2012
$ 1.8 billion – 2013
$ 1.8 billion – 2014
$ 1.8 billion – 2015
$ 1.8 billion – 2016
$ 1.8 billion – 2017
$ 1.9 billion – 2018

Total: $ 19.9 billion

New Brunswick

Clean federal fiscal transfers

– $ 3.7 billion – 2007
– $ 3.9 billion – 2008
– $ 4.4 billion – 2009
– $ 4.8 billion – 2010
– $ 4.7 billion – 2011
– $ 4.5 billion – 2012
– $ 4.4 billion – 2013
– $ 4.3 billion – 2014
– $ 4.5 billion – 2015
– $ 4.6 billion – 2016
– $ 4.8 billion – 2017
– $ 4.9 billion – 2018

Total: – $ 53.6 billion.

Equation accepted

$ 1.5 billion – 2007
$ 1.6 billion – 2008
$ 1.7 billion – 2009
$ 1.7 billion – 2010
$ 1.7 billion – 2011
$ 1.6 billion – 2012
$ 1.6 billion – 2013
$ 1.6 billion – 2014
$ 1.7 billion – 2015
$ 1.7 billion – 2016
$ 1.7 billion – 2017
$ 1.9 billion – 2018

Total: $ 20.0 billion

Manitoba

Clean federal fiscal transfers

– $ 4.0 billion – 2007
– $ 4.6 billion – 2008
– $ 4.9 billion – 2009
– $ 5.3 billion – 2010
– $ 4.9 billion – 2011
– $ 4.5 billion – 2012
– $ 4.0 billion – 2013
– $ 3.6 billion – 2014
– $ 3.6 billion – 2015
– $ 4.0 billion – 2016
– $ 4.4 billion – 2017
– $ 4.6 billion – 2018

Total: – $ 52.6 billion

Equation accepted

$ 1.8 billion – 2007
$ 2.1 billion – 2008
$ 2.1 billion – 2009
$ 2.1 billion – 2010
$ 2.0 billion – 2011
$ 1.9 billion – 2012
$ 1.8 billion – 2013
$ 1.8 billion – 2014
$ 1.7 billion – 2015
$ 1.7 billion – 2016
$ 1.8 billion – 2017
$ 2.0 billion – 2018

Total: $ 22.9 billion

Newfoundland and Labrador

Clean federal fiscal transfers

– $ 2.3 billion – 2007
– $ 1.7 billion – 2008
– $ 2.6 billion – 2009
– $ 2.6 billion – 2010
– $ 1.9 billion – 2011
– $ 1.7 billion – 2012
– $ 1.2 billion – 2013
– $ 1.1 billion – 2014
– $ 1.2 billion – 2015
– $ 1.4 billion – 2016
– $ 1.5. billion – 2017
– $ 1.1 billion – 2018

Total: – $ 20.3 billion

Equation accepted
$ 533 million – 2007
$ 124 million – 2008
$ 32 million – 2016

Total: $ 689 million

Prince Edward Island

Clean federal fiscal transfers

– $ 919 million – 2007
– $ 1.1 billion – 2008
– $ 1.2 billion – 2009
– $ 1.3 billion – 2010
– $ 1.2 billion – 2011
– $ 1.1 billion – 2012
– $ 1.2 billion – 2013
– $ 1.1 billion – 2014
– $ 1.1 billion – 2015
– $ 1.1 billion – 2016
– $ 1.3 billion – 2017
– $ 1.4 billion – 2018

Total: – $ 13.9 billion

Equation accepted

$ 295 million – 2007
$ 328 million – 2008
$ 338 million – 2009
$ 344 million – 2010
$ 346 million – 2011
$ 331 million – 2012
$ 337 million – 2013
$ 355 million – 2014
$ 363 million – 2015
$ 371 million – 2016
$ 389 million – 2017
$ 421 million – 2018

Total: $ 4.2 billion

Saskatchewan

Clean federal fiscal transfers

– $ 1.2 billion – 2007
– $ 821 million – 2008
– $ 519 million – 2009
– $ 867 million – 2010
– $ 266 million – 2011
$ 46 million – 2012
$ 780 million – 2013
$ 1.3 billion – 2014
$ 1.1 billion – 2015
$ 126 million – 2016
– $ 369 million – 2017
– $ 315 million – 2018

Total: – $ 1.1 billion

Equation accepted

$ 173 million – 2007
$ 59 million – 2008

Total: $ 232 million

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