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The chef and the Aussie chef are divided on the issue of frozen avocados



Can you freeze the avocado? The answer may surprise you.

Cafe chefs and fancy dining chefs are divided based on whether to support controversial practices or not. But changing prices and huge demand for beloved fruit means new storage techniques will inevitably emerge.

After seeing a viral post about training this week, news.com.au approached chefs and cooks to find out if our beloved avo is frozen, and how likely visitors are eating frozen fruit.

AVO FROZEN USED IN 'DAILY BASIC'

A business owner said a farm in Australia sells "crushed" fruit, which is frozen and thawed before serving.

The franchisor, who manages a number of cafes but does not want to be named, said that using frozen products is very easy to destroy avo dishes.

"This particular product is still quite chunky and (has) a real avo flavor. But it's hard to find one that doesn't seem to be processed or guacamole-y, "he told news.com.au.

"The main reason behind buying frozen packages for restaurants is the season. You get fixed prices throughout the year when the price of fresh avocados can skyrocket if the supply is short. "

He said frozen products, made from 100 percent avocados, are used in his business every day.

CHEFS IS NOT VERY SO MUCH

Delicious chefs cannot understand the need to freeze avocados.

He and other chefs said the fruit, which has a high fat and water content, is not ideal for freezing. They both expressed concern over freezing avo, saying that the fruit would likely be "funny" after it was thawed.

"Chefs are the last hand of the product line and avo is just something you don't order too much, they are too expensive," the chef said to news.com.au.

He said if a kitchen buys avocados, they are "treated" in a menu, even the skin is calculated and used.

"I can't think of a reason to freeze it. Unless you have a tree. "

Koki said he could understand in the cafe environment that financial pressures and the changing prices of avocado boxes (prices regularly shift from $ 60 to $ 90 a month) could make freezing necessary to control overhead.

He said a cafe owner might be able to control the fruit "dropping water" (being funny) while melting it using an acidic form, like lemon.

"Do you know why it destroys toast instead of fresh toast?" He asked.

"Avo that is crushed has lemon, or acid in it," he said, saying the addition of "acid" might be a secret sauce that stops the fruit from being destroyed when it is frozen.

Avocado Hass has traditionally ripened in cooler months, and trees that have high fruit yields are often followed by years of low yields. Avocado Shepard, also grown in Australia, is available only for a short period this year, according to Australian Avocado.

Some cooks said the frozen product was doable but had some disadvantages, mostly related to losing "consistency".

HOW TO FREEZE AVOCADES

The short answer is that you can freeze avocados, but you need to process them a little to successfully freeze them.

"Peel and take (seeds)," a cook who froze their avos suggested.

"The seal is airtight because air causes it to perish. It will not cook in the freezer so before it is frozen let it cook at room temperature," he said.

"It's okay to (freeze) your avo as long as your container is properly sealed," said another kitchen worker.

"There is no room for air and melt it," he said. He says avocados are fine in a sandwich, but will only last for a day or two.

Continue the conversation phoebe.loomes@news.com.au


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