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I was Raised by a Father with Bipolar Disorder, and This Is What I Want Other Parents to Know



<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "There lots of ups and downs grow with my father. There is a side of my father who is so full of life. He will be the center of attention, hold large gatherings at our house and chat enthusiastically with everyone around him, including his children. I remember how easy it was to make people laugh and calm them down. "Data-reactid =" 22 "> There are many ups and downs with my father. There is a side of my father who is so full of life. He will be the center of attention, hold a big meeting at our house and chat enthusiastically with everyone around him, including I remember how easy it was for him to make people laugh and calm them down.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Then there is the side of my dad who drives me and friends I went to the nearest amusement park, quickly became annoyed with everything we said or did, and then fell asleep on a park bench for three hours. On vacation, he would switch from enjoying himself to disappearing from us for a long time at a time. More generally, he struggling to focus during the conversation with family or client work. "data-reactid =" 23 "> Then there was my father's side who took me and my friends to the nearest amusement park, quickly becoming annoyed with everything we said or did, and then fell asleep on a park bench for three hours on vacation, he will switch from enjoying himself to disappearing from us for a long time at a time.More generally, he struggles to focus during conversations with his family or client's work.

Even with a happier father's mood, there are so many moments, days, months, even years of sadness that spent my childhood. There were many times he was unbearable to be near him. I often choose not to invite friends, afraid that he will experience episodes when they are there. As a young girl and even during my teenage years, it was very difficult to witness the change in my father's severe mood. When he's hyper and happy, it's contagious – but when his mood changes, I consider it personally, really feels as if I have done or said something to make him act like that.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Related: Sometimes My Anxiety Cause Me to Melt in Front of My Children, and Maybe It's OK "data-reactid =" 25 "> Related: Sometimes My Anxiety Cause Me to Melt in Front of My Children, and Maybe There Is No Problem

How Do Parents With Anxiety Feel

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Today I understand that good and bad moods are more accurately described as manic (when he is happy and energetic) and depressed (when he cannot stay awake or withdraw from those around him). The revelation came when I was 18 years old, and my father finally agreed try marriage counseling with my mother. He had begged him for years to find the help he needed, always working to protect me and my brothers. After several sessions where they discussed their problems as partners, the therapist suggested that my father begin to see for themselves at least one session per week. That's when we finally received a diagnosis: bipolar II disorder. "data-reactid =" 38 "> Today I understand that good and bad moods are more accurately described as manic (when he is happy and energetic) and depression (when he cannot stay awake or withdraw from those around him ) The disclosure came when I was 18 years old, and my father finally agreed to try marriage counseling with my mother. He had begged him for years to find the help he needed, always working to protect me and my brothers. the session where they discussed their problem as a partner, the therapist suggested that my father begin to see for themselves at least one session per week, that's when we finally received a diagnosis: bipolar II disorder.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Even so, my father still denied. He refused treatment and often gets angry because it's labeled like this. He stopped going to therapy, even though it helped. To this day, he has never been fully treated. "data-reactid =" 39 "> In fact, my father still denied. He refused drugs and was often angry because he was labeled like this. He stopped going to therapy, even though it helped. To this day, he has never been fully treated .

As an adult woman. . . with my own child now, I feel sorry for my father. . . but it took a long time to get to this place of acceptance, forgiveness and empathy.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Relief of diagnosis immediately gave way to heartbreak When I entered the year first lecture – right around the 19th birthday – my parents divorced. The change hit me harder than I expected. I entered a new phase of life, and now I have to deal with the separation of my parents, along with the emotional burden that I still bring it from childhood, which manifests as low anxiety and self-esteem, which encourages me, more than anything, to try therapy for myself. Therapy allows me to speak openly for the first time about how it feels to grow with someone whose mental illness is not treated. After almost a year of regular sessions, I was able to better understand my childhood and why I felt very anxious and anxious as a young adult. My therapist give me the tools I need to overcome them, and he is a big reason I'm still trying to have a healthy relationship with my father today. "data-reactid =" 42 "> Relief of diagnosis immediately gave way to heartbreak. When I entered my first year of college – right around my 19th birthday – my parents divorced. The change hit me harder than I expected I entered a new phase of life, and now I have to deal with the separation of my parents, along with the emotional burden that I still carry from my childhood, which is manifested as anxiety and low self-esteem.This encourages me, more than anything, to try therapy for myself. therapy allows me to speak openly for the first time about how it feels to grow with someone who has mental illness. After almost a year of regular sessions, I can better understand my childhood and why I feel very anxious and anxious like a young adult, my therapist gave me the tools I needed to deal with it, and he was a I am still trying to have a healthy relationship with my father today.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Related: Want to Start Therapy but Not Sure Where to Turn? Let This Article Be Your Guide "data-reactid =" 43 "> Related: Want to Start Therapy but Not Sure Which Way to Turn? Let This Article Be Your Guide

Beginner Tips For Finding A Therapist

As a mature woman in her mid-20s with my own child now, I feel sorry for my father that he suffered through this manic episode and depression – but it took a long time to get to the place of acceptance, forgiveness, and empathy. There are still days when I choose not to be near my father, but I try my best.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Recognizes that my father had bipolar II disorder and refused the treatment difficult for me, but I never wanted to be the type of parent who denied this reality. I planned to be open and honest with my daughter as we get older and convince him that I will always be there for him, no matter what he feels. I will be the first to encourage therapy if he feels he needs it for himself. And I hope that by sharing my story, other parents will see that taking care of themselves can make them more emotionally available to their children. People with mental illness can be loving parents too. It's only humans who need a little help along the way. "Data-reactid =" 57 "> Recognizing that my father had bipolar II disorder and refused treatment was difficult for me, but I never wanted to be the type of parent who denied this, part of their reality. I plan to be open and honest With my daughter when she grew up and assured her that I would always be there for her, no matter what she felt, I would be the first to encourage therapy if she ever felt like she needed it for herself, and I hope to share my story other parents will see that caring for themselves can make them more emotionally available to their children, people with mental illness can also be loving parents who need a little help along the way.


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