The Delta 4 rocket launched the NROL-71 spy satellite after a one-month delay



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The spy satellite secret of the National Reconnaissance Office, NROL-71, was launched today by the United Launch Alliance Delta 4 Heavy rocket into the sunny California sky.

Today's trouble-free countdown at Vandenberg Air Force Base comes differently from a series of technical disruptions that hold off taking more than a month.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The original launch date has been set for December 7, but the problem technical & nbsp; – including concerns about hydrogen leakage on one of the engine parts & nbsp; – forced repeated delays. One memorable delay came just when a fireball was seen in the area, spark a moment's mystery."data-reactid =" 24 "> The original launch date was set for December 7, but technical problems – including concerns about hydrogen leakage on one part of the machine – forced a repeated delay. One unforgettable delay came only as a fireball was seen in the area that, triggered a moment's mystery.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Many mysteries still surround the NROL-71 mission: External experts suspect that the charge can be the first of those known as Block 5 KH-11 spy satellite& nbsp; – the next generation cousin of the Hubble Space Telescope who is in charge of watching over the Earth and not heaven. "data-reactid =" 25 "> Many mysteries still surround the NROL-71 mission: Outside experts suspect that the charge could be the first of what is known as the Block 5 KH-11 spy satellite – the next generation cousin of the Outdoor Telescope Hubble Space is in charge of watching over the Earth and not the sky.

Neither United Launch Alliance nor NRO said anything about the score.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "To maintain operational security, ULA cuts updates on the progress of the mission a little more than six minutes after taking off at 11:10 in the morning PT post launch statement, ULA indicated that he obtained NROL-71 to a a successful start. "data-reactid =" 29 "> To maintain operational security, ULA cut the update on the progress of the mission a little more than six minutes after PT 11:10's takeoff, but in a post-launch statement, ULA indicated that it received NROL-71 to a a successful start.

"Congratulations to our team and mission partners for successfully delivering this important asset to support the national security mission," said Gary Wentz, vice president of ULA government and commercial programs. "Thank you to the entire team for their perseverance, continuous dedication, and focus on 100 percent mission success."

In a series of tweets, the NRO also confirmed the success of the launch:

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