Wednesday , February 24 2021

Grindelwald's crime is the Wet Squib




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Newt Scamander, wondering what he did in this franchise.

There is always one striking weakness with Fantastic Animals film, right from the first entry. The clue is actually in the title, mixed words are almost as awkward The emergence of the ape planet.

The problem is, there are two very separate stories in this franchise, which are forcibly interwoven together; Fantastic Animals, the unique story of an eccentric animal lover, and Grindelwald crime, an unclear allegory about the rise of fascism.

The two conflicting stories were made for the first entry that was out of focus, and the sequel failed to concentrate and make corrections. In fact, the third story is stuck in a crowded narrative, which we will call "Trust and Crisis of Chronic Identity." & Nbsp; & nbsp;

It is difficult to pass. Apart from extraordinary sets, costumes and designs, there is nothing fun in watching a series of unrelated random conflicts, which are as beautiful as their visuals. There are no clear bets, no momentum that drives the story forward, because there is no protagonist, and there is no clear agenda, from anyone.

Is Newt the protagonist? Sort of, but there's no need for him to be involved in the awakening of the witch-Hitler, and it feels as if he knows that. Often, he only stands on the sidelines during plot turns, not contributing anything to the scene but painful facial expressions. & nbsp;

Dumbledore (played by Jude Law, the best casting choice in the film), is certainly not the protagonist. He never faced his archenemies because the script forbade him, so he sent cryptozoologist introverts in his name, because we all know the best weapon to fight fascism is … animals. & nbsp;

And that's clearly not Credence, a very unattractive character that is only determined by his melodramatic childhood. Credence spends his time on the sullen screen, has a tantrum of explosive magic, and is told that he is not the person he thinks.

What is frustrating is, I really like Newt, and I like his fantastic creatures (especially Chinese dragon cats – he's a real scene thief). I gladly watch small scale, Ghostbusters-style story, starring Newt trying to tame the unbreakable.

Instead, we were given a five-part film series that was bloated about a magical Nazi that looked like an MDMA tablet that was far from claiming its dying love to DJs. Johnny Depp does a good job, but there is no personality character for his character, other than "being evil." And just to prove how evil he is, he will randomly kill a toddler – a big decision for a family movie.

And there are other strange strange scenes inserted here, seemingly without reason other than to provoke an emotional reaction. However, Dumbledore's sexuality, much discussed, referenced as in the novel, which says, never. Also, Nagini made a truly useless appearance, as did Nicholas Flamel; J.K. Rowling seemed to follow George Lucas's route and his winding prequel was filled with unnecessary fan services and backstories.

I will continue to turn to the spoilerish region to discuss my biggest problem with Grindelwald; he is not a good metaphor for fascism. Fascists tend to have silver tongues, they attract ordinary people into the ideology of hatred using the magic of words. That's how Magneto does it at X-Men franchise, which is why he is a fantastic villain.

Grindelwald, however, has little to say – his party's trick is to show a vision of the impending sequel to World War I, to prove to his audience that non-magical members of humanity are basically violent.

That's all – that's the level of sales. Not only does it feel bland to bring up Holocaust horror during children's blockbusters (the magic world must reflect the real world, not directly refer to it), it's also lazy stories.

At the end of the film, it was clear that we had wasted our time, after going through a 2-hour teaser for the conflict maybe play next time. Or maybe, the time after that. We still have three more films until we reach the end of this story, remember, so expect more fillers, and more senseless cameos from the background Harry Potter character.

This franchise needs to justify its existence, fast, or at other times, even the most dedicated image artisan does not need to bother appearing.

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Newt Scamander, wondering what he did in this franchise.

There is always one striking weakness with Fantastic Animals film, right from the first entry. The clue is actually in the title, mixed words are almost as awkward The emergence of the ape planet.

The problem is, there are two very separate stories in this franchise, which are forcibly interwoven together; Fantastic Animals, the unique story of an eccentric animal lover, and Grindelwald crime, an unclear allegory about the rise of fascism.

The two conflicting stories were made for the first entry that was out of focus, and the sequel failed to concentrate and make corrections. In fact, the third story is stuck in a crowded narrative, which we will call "Trust and Crisis of Chronic Identity."

It is difficult to pass. Apart from extraordinary sets, costumes and designs, there is nothing fun in watching a series of unrelated random conflicts, which are as beautiful as their visuals. There are no clear bets, no momentum that drives the story forward, because there is no protagonist, and there is no clear agenda, from anyone.

Is Newt the protagonist? Sort of, but there's no need for him to be involved in the awakening of the witch-Hitler, and it feels as if he knows that. Often, he only stands on the sidelines during plot turns, not contributing anything to the scene but painful facial expressions.

Dumbledore (played by Jude Law, the best casting choice in the film), is certainly not the protagonist. He never faced his archenemies because the script forbade him, so he sent cryptozoologist introverts in his name, because we all know the best weapon to fight fascism is … animals.

And that's clearly not Credence, a very unattractive character that is only determined by his melodramatic childhood. Credence spends his time on the sullen screen, has a tantrum of explosive magic, and is told that he is not the person he thinks.

What is frustrating is, I really like Newt, and I like his fantastic creatures (especially Chinese dragon cats – he's a real scene thief). I gladly watch small scale, Ghostbusters-style story, starring Newt trying to tame the unbreakable.

Instead, we were given a five-part film series that was bloated about a magical Nazi that looked like an MDMA tablet that was far from claiming its dying love to DJs. Johnny Depp does a good job, but there is no personality character for his character, other than "being evil." And just to prove how evil he is, he will randomly kill toddlers – big decisions for family films.

And there are other strange strange scenes inserted here, seemingly without reason other than to provoke an emotional reaction. However, Dumbledore's sexuality, much discussed, referenced as in the novel, which says, never. Also, Nagini made a truly useless appearance, as did Nicholas Flamel; J.K. Rowling seemed to follow George Lucas's route and his winding prequel was filled with unnecessary fan services and backstories.

I will continue to turn to the spoilerish region to discuss my biggest problem with Grindelwald; he is not a good metaphor for fascism. Fascists tend to have silver tongues, they attract ordinary people into the ideology of hatred using the magic of words. That's how Magneto does it at X-Men franchise, which is why he is a fantastic villain.

Grindelwald, however, has little to say – his party's trick is to show a vision of the impending sequel to World War I, to prove to his audience that non-magical members of humanity are basically violent.

That's all – that's the level of sales. Not only does it feel bland to bring up Holocaust horror during children's blockbusters (the magic world must reflect the real world, not directly refer to it), it's also lazy stories.

At the end of the film, it was clear that we had wasted our time, after going through a 2-hour teaser for the conflict maybe play next time. Or maybe, the time after that. We still have three more films until we reach the end of this story, remember, so expect more fillers, and more senseless cameos from the background Harry Potter character.

This franchise needs to justify its existence, fast, or at other times, even the most dedicated image artisan does not need to bother appearing.


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